Archive for March, 2005

Heavy

Tuesday, March 29th, 2005

House must fire one of his doctors and leaves them to think about it while they deal with an overweight 10-year old child who suffered a heart attack as the result of taking diet pills. House is also faced with a woman who won’t accept surgery for a 30 lb. tumor because she wants to remain overweight.

Mob Rules

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2005

Just before mobster Joey Arnello spills the beans in federal court and enters witness protection, he collapses. Is he faking? A court order instructs House to find out – and fast. House and his team struggle to diagnose and cure Joey while Joey’s brother Bill tries to slow things down and keep Joey from testifying. Meanwhile, Cuddy struggles to convince Vogler that House is an essential part of the hospital.

Hogzilla

Monday, March 21st, 2005

Hogzilla
The truth behind the urban legend of Hogzilla, an enormous hog-like animal, that a Georgia hunter claims to have killed and buried, is revealed.

Deadliest Weapons

Thursday, March 17th, 2005


In this fiery hour, we profile five of the world’s deadliest weapons, focusing on the inventors, battles, and dark technology behind their lethality. Beginning with the deadliest bomb ever created, the Tsar Bomba–a 50-megaton nuclear bomb–we move on to the deadliest weapons ever used on people, the atomic bombs exploded over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945. During WWI, the machine gun led to the deaths of over 8-million, and in WWII, the use of incendiary bombs killed hundreds of thousands of people. Another deadly invention of WWII was the proximity fuse, or VT fuse, that allowed artillery to detonate within a predetermined range of an enemy target. Finally, we examine VX nerve gas–a deadly chemical agent used twice by Saddam Hussein with devastating results–and visit Edgewood Chemical BioCenter, where suspicious items in the current war in Iraq are examined for traces of VX.

Control

Tuesday, March 15th, 2005

Billionaire entrepreneur Edward Vogler spends $100 million on the clinic and becomes the new Chairman of the Board. As a businessman, Vogler intends to turn the clinic into a profitable venue for his biotech venture and plans to eliminate the financially draining services of Dr. House. Meanwhile, a businesswoman who has it all – perfect life, perfect body, perfect job – finds herself inexplicably paralyzed. When he diagnoses her secret, House must risk his job and his medical license to get her a necessary transplant.

Tiny Humans: The Hobbits of Flores

Monday, March 14th, 2005
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Fossils
The documentary introduces the discoveries of fossil remains of tiny humans that once belonged to a race of three foot tall humans that lived just 18,000 years ago. Fossils that were discovered buried in the limestone caves on the remote Indonesian island of Flores.

Volcano Alert

Thursday, March 10th, 2005



Galeras, Fuego, St. Helens, Kilauea, Popocatepetl. These are names of currently active volcanoes. They all have the ability to end human life, destroy millions of dollars of property, and instill fear. Volcanoes are necessary to build mountains, create new geological features, and are, figuratively speaking, the veins of our planet. Despite the brilliance and vividness of volcanoes, there is an intensity that cannot be escaped. This intensity has caused the deaths of over 30,000 people in just the last two decades. That’s why it’s important for scientists to be able predict when a volcano will erupt. To get an idea as to what’s happening beneath the surface, vocanologists measure the temperature and gas content of magma as it rises in underground chambers, as well as changes in the movement of the nearby surface. Their goal is to recognize all the predictable signs of an eruption and, like a jigsaw puzzle, put them all together into predictions that are accurate.

SWAT

Thursday, March 10th, 2005


Special weapons and tactics (SWAT) originated in the mid-1960s after several sniping incidents against civilians and police officers nationwide, particularly in Los Angeles during and after the Watts Riots. But on August 1, 1966, Charles Whitman changed the face of police tactics forever, when he randomly killed dozens of people using a high-powered rifle from atop the University of Texas clock tower. We explore the origins, tools, and dramatic stories of LA, Austin, and St. Louis SWAT units.

Taxidermy

Thursday, March 10th, 2005


It began as a tool used by prehistoric man to attract animals to the hunt. Over time it became an invaluable study aid for the natural scientist and a popular hobby for hunters and fishermen. Join us for a tantalizing look at the history of taxidermy, the craft of preserving animal skins and using them to recreate a still life of the animal as it appeared in life. We also check out fiberglass reproduction, which is gaining popularity as fish and game regulations become stricter. Finally, we examine human subjects in taxidermy. Using the very latest process of plastination, the once taboo science and art of preserving and displaying human corpses now draws crowds in Europe, Asia, and the U.S., proving the age-old practice continues to mesmerize us!

Edwards Air Force Base

Thursday, March 3rd, 2005


Examine the colorful history of the premier flight test center, and America’s most important aviation facility for more than 60 years, Edwards Air Force Base in California. Every single aircraft to enter the Air Force’s inventory has been put through its paces at Edwards, along with many Navy and Army aircraft as well. With unprecedented access to several forgotten and abandoned facilities on the base, we are guided by Richard Hallion, former chief historian for the U.S. Air Force. Today, Edwards continues to push the envelope. Among the many cutting-edge projects currently being tested is the Airborne Laser, designed to focus a basketball-sized spot of intense heat that could destroy a ballistic missile.